Trading with the Enemy: A U.S. law that only applies to Cuba

Oct 5, 2019 by

Trading with the Enemy: A U.S. law that only applies to Cuba

Amidst the escalation of U.S. hostile policy toward Cuba, President Trump announced the extension, for one more year, of the law which serves as the basis for the blockade

Author: International news staff | informacion@granma.cu

september 23, 2019 16:09:48

Photo: Martirena

As expected, amidst the escalation of the U.S. government’s hostile policy toward Cuba, President Donald Trump announced the extension, for one more year, of the law which serves as the basis for the blockade.

The Trading with the Enemy Act, approved by Congress on October 6, 1917, gives the President the authority to restrict U.S. trade with “hostile” countries, and the option of applying economic sanctions in times of war, or any other period of national emergency, and prohibits trade with the enemy, or allies of the enemy, during military conflicts.

Under this law, the oldest of its kind, the Cuban Assets Control regulations were adopted in 1963, after the blockade of Cuba was declared in 1962 by President John F. Kennedy, also based on this statute.

Cuba is today the only country for which this legislation remains in effect. Other countries such as China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, and Vietnam were also designated as subject to this legislation in the past.

One of the absurdities of this irrational law against Cuba is that the White House has never declared a national emergency with respect to our country, and we are not at war, yet, successive U.S. Presidents have extended the law’s application year after year.

This legislation is part of the legal framework that sustains the blockade, which includes several laws and administrative regulations, such as the Foreign Assistance Act (1961); Export Administration Act (1979); the Cuban Democracy Actor Torricelli of 1992; the Helms Law-Burton (1996); as well as Export Administration Regulations (1979).

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